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Cuttlefish in the Home Aquarium Part 2

Within the first week, the other three eggs hatched. According to others who have kept bandensis cuttlefish, if they are born with a yolk sac still attached, as Lazarus was, the survival rate is pretty dismal. However, since I helped him to struggle free of his with a pipette, it’s …

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BiologyNatureScienceScience & Nature

Cuttlefish in the Home Aquarium Part 1

In August, I began a project that I’d wanted to do for a very long time: keeping dwarf cuttlefish in a home aquarium. I’ve been a long-time aquarist, and have even kept octopuses on a few occasions, but cuttlefish had always been hard to come by. In August I received …

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BiologyFoodPaleontologyReligionScienceScience & Nature

Heritage and Challah

This past weekend was Rosh Hashana, which is the Jewish new year. Which is all well and good, but why would a devout atheist stay up late making challah, and why would she write about it for this blog?

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ActivitiesArtFeaturedScience & Nature

Making Mycological Masterpieces

Identifying mushrooms can be a lot of fun, but it can also leave you with beautiful artwork. Today I would like to tell you about the mycologist’s art: spore prints. When identifying mushrooms, one of the key features is spore color. The spores of a mushroom are its reproduction unit, …

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BiologyMedicineNatureScienceScience & Nature

Yet another high profile paper about yet another epigenome that says the same thing, yet again.

A recent study developed a new way of probing the genome for “accessible” sites, and found the same things that we’ve been seeing for years.

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BiologyComicScienceScience & Nature

Gotta Formalin ’em All: The Marine Biology of Eugenie Clark, The Shark Lady. (Women in Science 42)

To the uninitiated, there seems a dizzying amount of carnage wrapped up in advancing biological knowledge. Every scrap of information that we have about the function of an unknown organ or curious behavior of an obscure species is usually bought in the coin of death. Sometimes, that knowledge lets us …

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AstronomyComicFeaturedfeminismScienceScience & Nature

Computing Venus: The Astronomy of Maria Mitchell (Women in Science 38)

In the early nineteenth century nothing about the island of Nantucket made sense. It was simultaneously a hotbed of Quakerism and of the notoriously bawdy and violent whaling industry, a deeply conservative and god-fearing community that was at the same time at the fore-front of gender equality in education and …

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