Elizabeth Finn's Posts

Officially underwater: Nanowrimo update 3

Officially underwater: Nanowrimo update 3

Day: 18 Goal word count: 30,000 Word count: 25,013 Mood: Overwhelmed Prognosis: Need to sit down and write. »

Writing by the seat of my pants: Nanowrimo update 2

Writing by the seat of my pants: Nanowrimo update 2

Day: 10 Goal word count: 16,667 Current word count: 17,781 Mood: Circumspect Prognosis: I did a lot of cleaning up today, which I hope will set me up better from here on out. »

Why not just write a novel: NaNoWriMo update 1

Why not just write a novel: NaNoWriMo update 1

This year, for the first time in a few years, I’m participating in Nanowrimo. For those of you who might not know, Nanowrimo stands for “National Novel Writing Month” and is (somewhat counterintuitively) an international, online community dedicated to writing novella-length pieces of prose in November. The goal: write 50,000 words. I’ve participated 5 times so far, and reac... »

That time we went to NASA

That time we went to NASA

This past weekend, Nasa Ames had an open house to celebrate their 75th anniversary — something that hasn’t happened in 17 years. It was amazing, and some of you probably couldn’t make it on account of not being in the bay area (or not being up all night the night they released tickets). We went, and took some pictures! »

Nature, Nuture, and Social Justice

Nature, Nuture, and Social Justice

Over the past week, several articles have come to my attention for various reasons that stress the “nature” part of “nature vs. nurture”. And as I read them, I noticed that the reaction they provoked wasn’t a scientific one necessarily, but a philosophical one. Maybe even a moral one. And here’s the thing: I think that “solving” the “nature vs. nurture” debate is actually a sideline from the moral... »

Caveman genes — what our shared history with Denisovans means

Caveman genes — what our shared history with Denisovans means

A recent article in Nature determines, fairly conclusively, that a certain variant of a certain gene which allows Tibetans to thrive at high altitudes comes directly from interbreeding with Denisovans — from an extinct cousin of Homo Sapiens Sapiens. »

Life is not a ladder. Or, really, a tree.

Life is not a ladder. Or, really, a tree.

I’m going to stand on a soapbox for a second and talk about life. In particular, I’m going to talk about evolution. In a lot of common parlance, and a lot of media, we refer to evolution as something like a ladder — think the terrible image I used as my featured image. Humans are usually at the top. Even when we’re being really careful about it, we use a metaphor like a tre... »

Not-So-Jurassic Park

Not-So-Jurassic Park

Here’s a question for you: What do you get when you put a mammoth genome into an elephant egg? Is it a mammoth or an elephant or something else? And why would you do it? »

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