Mad Art Cast is back with an informative episode all about those things they don’t teach you art school! This week we talk about all the noncreative tasks that have to get done to run an art business, be a professional painter or play in a money-making band.

We also have a special guest interview from a creative adjacent named Dawn Olive. Creative adjacent is our fancy title for the-person-who-helps-creative-people-be-creative. Some artists are successful enough to have a manager like this and it’s what our cohost A is known for doing so well. Dawn Olive also does this type of work for the science org, CosmoQuest and she tells us some of what that entails.

Then the gang chats about everything from reeds to taxes and we talk about what noncreative tasks we really wish we could toss out the window with Brian’s never ending laundry pile.

It’s a fun episode with lots of info. Listen below or find us on iTunes!

In Dawn’s interview, she talks about Dr. Alfred Bader, who founded Aldrich Chemical Company.




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Amy Roth

Amy Roth

Amy Davis Roth (aka Surly Amy) is a multimedia artist who resides in Los Angeles, California. She makes Surly-Ramics and is the founder and president of the Los Angeles Women's Atheist and Agnostic Group: LAWAAG. She is also the fearless leader of Mad Art Lab and cohost of Mad Art Cast. Support her on Patreon. Follow her on twitter: @SurlyAmy or on Google+.


  1. March 11, 2016 at 11:41 pm

    The hardest part for me is carving out the time in my life to do it at all. I make videos with a collective, ranging from videogames to music to podcasts to vlogging. So there’s writing, filming, editing, postproduction, a million little steps for each one, and most of the production falls to me. It’s easy to keep the partner series going, but my personal projects get hard to fit in, and those are the ones that are really going to push my skills and help me take it to the next level. They’re also the first thing to get dropped if I’m ill, working overtime, or sign on for another project.

  2. March 11, 2016 at 11:55 pm

    Ugh yes, post production stuff is so time consuming! I feel ya.

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