Moon

Bad Moon Rising

Bad Moon Rising

It was the night of February 27th, 2013. Rob and I were driving down a stretch of dark highway when it happened. As we crested a hill something strange appeared at the horizon: an orange, glowing, ovoid object slowly rising from the earth like a distant bubble of blooming magma – fiery and ominous. After the initial surprise of the unsettling sight I quickly realized that it was just the moon. But... »

Mad Quickies 2.4

Mad Quickies 2.4

Bugs made from electronic components.     A titanium utility ring.     Personalized Pez dispensers.     Shark face sushi tray.     Tentacle toilet plunger.     Printing buildings… on the Moon.     Magnetic modular shelving.     Pulp-O-mizer pulp magazine... »

Mad Quickies 10.8

Mad Quickies 10.8

D10 ring Sushi cupcakes Multilevel art desk Typographic chess set Phone booth aquarium Glass bottle lamp shades Evil monkey couch guardian Alien chestburster chocolate eggs That’s no moon; that’s an ice cream sandwich! »

Join the Million Crater Challenge and win Prizes

Join the Million Crater Challenge and win Prizes

It's global astronomy month and our pal Pamela Gay in cooperation with CosmoQuest wants you to know about a very cool amateur astronomy project. Not only will this project allow you to do some actual science but it can net you some pretty sweet prizes too. »

The Moon: Peer Review in Comics

The Moon: Peer Review in Comics

Last I was here, it was for the anniversary of Galileo’s landmark, first observations of the moon via telescope. Today I have a story about another moon observation, one that involves debate, peer review, and comics. See, when I first set out to draw science comics, I had decided from the get-go that, like science, I would revise comics if new evidence came to light. »

Calendar Curiosities: Galileo’s New View of an Old Friend

Calendar Curiosities: Galileo’s New View of an Old Friend

On November 30th, 1609, more than 400 years ago today, Galileo Galilei pointed his homemade “spyglass” at the moon. That night, he found himself staring at something that would change the way astronomers viewed the solar system forever. »