Painting

Women Painting Themselves pt 4

Women Painting Themselves pt 4

Hello! Today we’re finally going to expand our geographical horizons by a tiny bit* and talk about Judith Leyster. Judith Leyster 1609-1660 What I really like about Judith’s portrait is how she managed to make it look so spontaneous and full of personality. Before we had cameras with fast shutter speeds, holding any sort of expression other than a neutral glower long enough to capture ... »

Women Painting Themselves: pt 3

Women Painting Themselves: pt 3

Hello all, welcome to part three of the Women Painting Themselves series. Today we’re going to look at two artists instead of just one, Artemisia Gentileschi and Elizabetta Sirani. Artemisia Gentileschi 1593-c.1653 Self-portrait as the Allegory of Painting by Artemisia Gentileschi 1638-39 Out of all the artists I have or will mention, Artemisia is one of the most famous. And she certainly de... »

Women Painting Themselves pt 2

Women Painting Themselves pt 2

Hi all, welcome to part two of this series of self-portraits by women! Today we’re moving a little bit forwards in time, but staying in roughly the same geographical area (16th century Italy was kind of a big deal for art history) to talk about Lavinia Fontana Lavinia Fontana: 1552-1614 “Self-portrait at the Clavichord with a Servant by Lavinia Fontana” Like Sofonisba Anguissola,... »

Women Painting Themselves pt 1

Women Painting Themselves pt 1

Hi all, I’m Celia Yost, I’m a visual artist, and I’ve loved paintings and art museums and all that pretty much my entire life. So anyways, I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how women are visually represented in art (specifically painting, as that’s where my interest/background lies). If you’ve ever been to an art museum, you’re probably familiar with t... »

Paintings From The Space Lab

Paintings From The Space Lab

The annual sci-fi event in Minnesota known as Convergence happened recently, and I was thrilled to once again be a part of it. As many of you may know, this blog network helps to organize the science track at Convergence that we call SkepchickCon. We pack the stages with as many women scientists as we can and we also organize a lot of fun geeky-art panels and workshops intended to inspire and educ... »

Art by Amy Davis Roth from The American Atheist Art Show

Art by Amy Davis Roth from The American Atheist Art Show

I wanted to do a quick post that shows and explains the art that I created for display at the American Atheist Art show. I’m extremely grateful and proud to say that all four paintings sold and that 10% of the sales were donated to Ogden OUTreach, a local Utah organization that helps LGBT kids who have, among other things been turned out of their homes. So a special thanks to everyone who he... »

Here Be Invisible Dragons

Here Be Invisible Dragons

One recent evening I was browsing my Twitter timeline and I saw a wonderful and glorious thing. Friend of The Lab, Jocelyn Oudesluys (AKA: Quarksparrow), had made a children’s book adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Invisible Dragon story from his book, The Demon Haunted World. I proceeded to share it with my fellow Lab contributors at which point we all flipped out. You can read Jocelyn’... »

Maria Merian: The Princess Bubblegum of 17th Century Biology

Maria Merian: The Princess Bubblegum of 17th Century Biology

Biology took a while to figure itself out.  For centuries, it was a mish-mash of Aristotelian sentiments and cabinets of Unnatural Curiosities whose only organizing principle was a Ripleyish sense of the weird.  One of the great turning points came in 1735, with the publication of Carl Linneaus’s Systema Naturae, a work which systematized the chaos and provided a baseline for all further biologica... »

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