Comic

Of  Artificial Radiation  and  Natural Genius:  The Chemistry of Irène Joliot-Curie  (Women In Science 29)

Of Artificial Radiation and Natural Genius: The Chemistry of Irène Joliot-Curie (Women In Science 29)

  Radioactivity is a great thing. Terrible, but great. The medical applications of radioactively tagged molecules, as Rosalyn Yalow proved, are legion, and have saved millions of lives since their introduction. Tricky thing, though – the big atoms that tend to be radioactive also tend to be achingly rare and not particularly present in biological compounds. Radium, to take just one exam... »

Unearthing the World Jurassic: Mary Anning and the Founding of Paleontology (Women In Science 28)

Unearthing the World Jurassic: Mary Anning and the Founding of Paleontology (Women In Science 28)

As the tide rolls out, a woman in a hardened bonnet and loose fitting clothes scrambles across the crumbling cliffs of Lyme Regis, a large sack flung over her back, and pick axe in hand. She is Mary Anning, out on the hunt for fossils to sell in order to earn enough money to eat, and before her fifteenth birthday, her discoveries will challenge all established wisdom about the Earth’s geolog... »

Queen of Carbon: The Ongoing Materials Science Legacy Of Mildred Dresselhaus (Women In Science 27)

Queen of Carbon: The Ongoing Materials Science Legacy Of Mildred Dresselhaus (Women In Science 27)

  Carbon. Its astounding versatility is matched only by our total and historic complacency in the face of its wonders. “Carbon? Whatever – it’s, like, all over the place. Now, protactinium, there’s an element…” Working on the logic that exotic elements must breed exotic properties, and intoxicated by the trans-Uranium revolution of the 30s and 40s, the potential of carbon to surprise us still... »

Adventures in Chimpland: The Primatology Revolution of Jane Goodall. (Women in Science 26)

Adventures in Chimpland: The Primatology Revolution of Jane Goodall. (Women in Science 26)

Of all the figures I’ve done on Women In Science this year, none have evoked such instant and unequivocal expressions of admiration and downright love as Jane Goodall. “You’re doing Goodall next? She’s my absolute hero!” “I want her to adopt me.” “Goodall is the one who inspired me to do field research.” “She is my favorite living person,... »

Saving Oceans by Saving Otters: The Marine Conservation of Sandrine Hazan (Women in Science 25!)

Saving Oceans by Saving Otters: The Marine Conservation of Sandrine Hazan (Women in Science 25!)

The southern sea otter is the white knight of the Pacific Coastal ecosystem. In an ocean threatened by the ravenous kelp-ravaging hunger of a growing horde of sea urchins, the clever and noble otter is among the only marine creatures which are willing to eat these spikey, radially symmetric jerks. And because otters eat A Lot, the urchins are kept in check, and the kelp forests survive to serve as... »

Trades… Of… Science!  FBP: Federal Bureau of Physics, Volume 1.

Trades… Of… Science! FBP: Federal Bureau of Physics, Volume 1.

Quantum tornados, localized time dilation, and fluctuating gravity are the workaday business of the Federal Bureau of Physics, a governmental organization tasked with handling “physics-related emergencies,” in Simon Oliver and Robbi Rodriguez’s ongoing comic series FBP. In the universe they create, the normal rules of physics are bent and torn as parallel universes slide over each other, generatin... »

The Secret Life of Hormones: Rosalyn Yalow and the Discovery of Radioimmunoassaying

The Secret Life of Hormones: Rosalyn Yalow and the Discovery of Radioimmunoassaying

There’s an unsung immensity in the craft of Measuring Things Better. Within our twisting cleverness for developing better and better measurement tools there lies the secret of our advancement not only as science-doers, but as a species generally. The dramatic potential for improving human life through better measurement has no grander success story than that of Rosalyn Yalow, co-discoverer of Radi... »

Our Neighbor Australopithecus: The Anthropology of Mary Leakey

Our Neighbor Australopithecus: The Anthropology of Mary Leakey

The 1960s and early 1970s were the Rock Star era of anthropology, when each year seemed to bring a stunning new glimpse into the early development of man, and being a top anthropologist was to be a household name on par with Buzz Aldrin or Leonard Bernstein. And while individual superstars like Donald Johanson shone meteorically from time to time in the firmament, the era as a whole belonged to on... »

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