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AstronomyComicFeaturedfeminismScienceScience & Nature

Computing Venus: The Astronomy of Maria Mitchell (Women in Science 38)

In the early nineteenth century nothing about the island of Nantucket made sense. It was simultaneously a hotbed of Quakerism and of the notoriously bawdy and violent whaling industry, a deeply conservative and god-fearing community that was at the same time at the fore-front of gender equality in education and …

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BiologyChemistryComicScience

Gerty Radnitz Cori: Glycogen to Glucose, and Back Again (Women in Science 37)

For a science teacher, perhaps the most dreaded question is “What Is Energy?” Sure, we have a standard answer – “The ability to do work” – but it’s a linguistic gloss over a principle so diverse in its manifestations that to go much further is to get lost amongst the …

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BiologyComicScience

Women in Science: The Next Generation. Featuring Lauren Uhde and Her Amazing Friends! (Women In Science 36)

For the past thirty-five episodes of Women in Science, the key word has been Bleak. We have seen a startling array of brilliant people ground just short of oblivion by titanic societal and institutional forces, lit here and there by moments of understated triumph. But what is it like for …

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ComicElectronicsFeaturedMathScience

Grace Hopper and the Democratization of Computer Programming (Women in Science 35)

In a room across the hall from where I teach, a group of a dozen kids between the ages of nine and thirteen are learning how to program in Python, grasping the basics of the language with what can only be described as freakish ease and comfort. It’s quite a …

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BiologyComicScience & Nature

Belle Benchley and the Creation of the Modern Zoo (Women in Science 34)

Think back to your last zoo trip. More likely than not, most of the larger animals were contained in open air facilities, with features tailored to the animal’s native landscape. The animals probably had free access to sleeping quarters away from the public view, and diets based upon their natural …

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ComicMath

Julia Robinson and the Cracking of Hilbert’s Tenth Problem (Women in Science 33)

For mathematicians, the only thing more exciting than proving a theorem is proving that it can never be proven. These anti-proofs, if you will, stand firmly against all future progress of humanity and state, “No matter how clever you become, what new branches of thought you invent, you’ll never be …

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ActivismBiologyComicFeaturedfeminism

Breaking the Shackles Procreative: Margaret Sanger and the Creation Of The Pill. (Women in Science 32)

In 1912, it was against the law to publish a book that contained descriptions of birth control methods. It was against the law to even expound the theoretical benefits of birth control as a general notion. It was against the law to put a contraceptive diaphragm into the hands of …

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ComicScience & Nature

Making Continents Move: The Ocean Cartography of Marie Tharp (Women in Science 31)

If you’re a scientist, and you’ve lived long enough, there’s a good chance that you’ll see your life’s work overwritten and forgotten in a long, piecemeal process blandly punctuated by retrospective award banquets every half decade or so. Science moves on, but usually at a pace that lets you keep …

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