EClark
BiologyComicScienceScience & Nature

Gotta Formalin ’em All: The Marine Biology of Eugenie Clark, The Shark Lady. (Women in Science 42)

To the uninitiated, there seems a dizzying amount of carnage wrapped up in advancing biological knowledge. Every scrap of information that we have about the function of an unknown organ or curious behavior of an obscure species is usually bought in the coin of death. Sometimes, that knowledge lets us …

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BiologyChemistryComicMedicineScience

Lymph, There It Is: Florence Sabin, Pioneer Woman of Medical Research (Women in Science 39)

For women in science, posterity has three fates in store. Some, like Marie Curie or Rosalyn Yalow, are recognized in their time and remain that way in the history books. Others, like Mary Anning or Marie Tharp, have to wait for later generations to rediscover them. And then there’s that …

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BiologyChemistryComicScience

Gerty Radnitz Cori: Glycogen to Glucose, and Back Again (Women in Science 37)

For a science teacher, perhaps the most dreaded question is “What Is Energy?” Sure, we have a standard answer – “The ability to do work” – but it’s a linguistic gloss over a principle so diverse in its manifestations that to go much further is to get lost amongst the …

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BiologyComicScience

Women in Science: The Next Generation. Featuring Lauren Uhde and Her Amazing Friends! (Women In Science 36)

For the past thirty-five episodes of Women in Science, the key word has been Bleak. We have seen a startling array of brilliant people ground just short of oblivion by titanic societal and institutional forces, lit here and there by moments of understated triumph. But what is it like for …

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BiologyComicScience & Nature

Belle Benchley and the Creation of the Modern Zoo (Women in Science 34)

Think back to your last zoo trip. More likely than not, most of the larger animals were contained in open air facilities, with features tailored to the animal’s native landscape. The animals probably had free access to sleeping quarters away from the public view, and diets based upon their natural …

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BiologyChemistryMathNaturephysicsScienceScience & Nature

The stars in our cells

A relatively recent study showed that transcription factors tend to hang out in specific areas of the nucleus, clustering like stars in galaxies. And it’s been rattling around in my head as potentially perfect for Mad Art Lab because they do, in fact, cluster like stars in galaxies — the …

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ActivismBiologyComicFeaturedfeminism

Breaking the Shackles Procreative: Margaret Sanger and the Creation Of The Pill. (Women in Science 32)

In 1912, it was against the law to publish a book that contained descriptions of birth control methods. It was against the law to even expound the theoretical benefits of birth control as a general notion. It was against the law to put a contraceptive diaphragm into the hands of …

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BiologyComicScience & Nature

The Monster in Dr. McClintock: The Twisted Tale of Jumping Genes

Isolation makes monsters, and none so monstrous as those who willingly seek it. It is hard to work up a great deal of sympathy for individuals who, under the banner of intellectual freedom, demand the resources to do whatever they want, however they want to do it, and then routinely …

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