Astronomy

Lab Track: Every Age

Lab Track: Every Age

Today’s Lab Track comes via the suggestion of Skepchick writer Jamie Bernstein, and it’s sure to give you chills. (Hey, did you know chills are associated with dopamine activity in the brain’s reward system? I wrote about that a few years ago.) The video is also very timely, what with the Philae lander touching down on comet 67P last Wednesday and humanity going oh, yeah, we land... »

That time we went to NASA

That time we went to NASA

This past weekend, Nasa Ames had an open house to celebrate their 75th anniversary — something that hasn’t happened in 17 years. It was amazing, and some of you probably couldn’t make it on account of not being in the bay area (or not being up all night the night they released tickets). We went, and took some pictures! »

Summing the Cosmos: Henrietta Swan Leavitt and The Saga of the Cepheid Stars (Women in Science 22)

Summing the Cosmos: Henrietta Swan Leavitt and The Saga of the Cepheid Stars (Women in Science 22)

Astronomy is the sifting science. Its practitioners rake the sky, star by star, collecting and cataloguing, and when they are done, they begin again, through years and decades and generations. What they leave behind are reams of papers, or stacks of photographic plates, singing to the future the shape of the sky they knew. Today, pouring over those records is the job of machines, which take the te... »

Elizabeth inside Hangar 1

The Best Neil deGrasse Tyson Intro Ever!

One week ago today at Apostacon in Omaha, Neil deGrasse Tyson spoke to a skeptic/atheist convention, a rarity for him, because, as he said that night, skeptics don’t need him to be a science communicator. His talk was typical Tyson, expansive, varying in subject, entertaining and engaging. The audience was held in rapt attention, there was even one point where the host attempted to move on t... »

Mary Somerville: Savior of British Mathematics.

Mary Somerville: Savior of British Mathematics.

In the 1750s, when France was foundering scientifically in the Cartesian shallows, it took Emilie du Châtelet’s French translation of Newton’s Principia to reinvigorate Continental physical science. Then it was England’s turn to toss itself headlong into the longest stretch of scientific stagnation it has ever known. From the age of Newton, Harvey, Halley, Boyle, Hooke, and Wren, there stretched a... »

#MALCosmos Live-Tweet Recap

#MALCosmos Live-Tweet Recap

Last night, a modern reboot of Carl Sagan’s classic TV show Cosmos, hosted by the very worthy Neil deGrasse Tyson, premiered on like eleventy billion channels. No word yet on how many tuned in, but I like to think that it was more than the Superbowl. Did you catch it last night? Waiting until it’s available online? Gonna watch when you have more time? If so, you missed Mad Art Lab̵... »

Galaxy NGC 60 Painting by Raven Vasquez

Mad Art Lab Live-Tweet Event: The Cosmos

In an effort to prove that live-tweeting exists for reasons other than snark, your Mad Art Labbers have decided to partake in a live-tweet event of something we’re actually excited for – the reboot of The Cosmos! Full disclosure, there will probably still be snark, but if you’d like to join in the fun, you can find us on Twitter using #MALCosmos. The reboot will be hosted by the ... »

An Oscars-Inspired Dinner

An Oscars-Inspired Dinner

I didn’t watch the Oscars this past Sunday, but I couldn’t avoid catching some of the buzz via Facebook and my other social media channels. By far my favorite thing to show up in my feed on Oscars night were–unsurprisingly–food related! My friend Laura Hepburn Engert planned a nine-course meal to help her celebrate the awards show, with one course inspired by each Best Pict... »

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